Survey Reveals State of Safety Professionals' Mental Health (Canadian Occupational Safety Article)

mental health Feb 28, 2020

While they may be exposed to traumatic events on the job, safety leaders are often unprepared for the ensuing emotional difficulties.

One-Quarter of COS readers have been diagnosed with a mental health disorder, finds survey

Andy Kerr was the go-to guy for electrical safety in the utility industry. He was involved in the development of the CSA Z462 standard for electrical safety and the CAN/ULC standard for electrical generation, transmission and distribution. He was the lead and subject matter expert for the Electrical Utility Safety Rules. He would regularly get calls from utilities all across Ontario — and sometimes out of province — for help with the rules and standards, training and incident or fatality investigations.  

But eventually, it all became too much.  

“The electrical community is small… So, you end up knowing just about everybody. The people you’ve done...

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Mental Well Being At Work Is A Business Priority. But Where To Start?

mental health Feb 10, 2020

Just before her 40th birthday, my mother was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. At the time, I would have just been born. Now at 91, she has lived with her mental illness for more than half her life. As I grew up, I saw my mother’s illness progress from bad to worse. Every five years she’d slip into a manic phase which would last four to five months.

Together, my parents owned a cleaning company. During her manic phases, mom wouldn’t sleep well. When she stopped sleeping, her delusions became grander and her paranoia worsened. She’d stay up nights obsessively cleaning to a point where one could eat off the floors of our house. When her manic episodes ended, she would slide into depression for six to eight months. We could never predict how long her depression would last. Eventually, her bouts of depression would be treated with Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Yet, my mother would go to work every day. Even through her protracted periods of mental illness,...

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How Stress Changes the Brain

stress May 02, 2019

Increased stress isn't just an inconvenience - it can change the way your brain and body work. Higher cortisol and adrenaline levels leave you at risk of digestive problems, heart attacks, and stroke. Don't let stress control your body - tackle the problem head-on with a commitment to interrupting the stress cycle.

Read the full article here. 

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